Saturday, May 30, 2015

Boulder cops declare ‘rock stacking’ a jailable offense to stop local artist who spent 7 years creating sculptures

Boulder cops declare ‘rock stacking’ a jailable offense to stop local artist who spent 7 years creating sculptures: “For the past 7 years i have been creating this art in and around Boulder, Colorado, USA. nearly every day!” he wrote. “[J]ust this weekend, one police officer has decided that balancing rocks in Boulder, Colorado is now illegal, obscurely referencing two city codes [5-4-8 and 5-4-2] about ‘destruction of public property’ in relation to rocks.”

“So now the police have belligerently taken it upon themselves to write tickets and/or arrest ANYONE balancing rocks in Boulder, CO. and specifically threatened to ticket me and/or arrest me if they catch me in the future,” the artist lamented. “[I] encourage as many people as possible (especially locals) to contact the city council here in Boulder and voice your support for this long standing tradition in Boulder. [I]t is something that an overwhelming portion of the community supports.”

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Wyoming law against data collection: Protecting ranchers by ignoring the environment.

According to this article, Utah and Idaho also have laws such as Wyoming. Wyoming's reason? That documenting the presence of E. coli bacteria in the water. That bacteria comes from cattle. Which suggests that the ranchers are behind this law. Hopefully this insane law will be challenged in the courts, as are the ones in Idaho and Utah.

Wyoming law against data collection: Protecting ranchers by ignoring the environment.: Imagine visiting Yellowstone this summer. You wake up before dawn to take a picture of the sunrise over the mists emanating from Yellowstone hot springs. A thunderhead towers above the rising sun, and the picture turns out beautifully. You submit the photo to a contest sponsored by the National Weather Service. Under a statute signed into law by the Wyoming governor this spring, you have just committed a crime and could face up to one year in prison. (Justin Pidot, Slate.)